Post Arcade

A video game news site from the friendly folks at the National Post who brought you FP Tech Desk.

Jul 10
Why video games will never have their “Citizen Kane moment”

By Chad Sapieha 
There is always a hope in an author or director or musician’s mind that what they’re creating might stand the test of time, that it may continue to draw audiences for decades – perhaps even centuries – into the future, long after their deaths.
Abbey Road isn’t doomed to obscurity because vinyl records have been largely replaced by digital recordings, Hamlet didn’t disappear when The Globe theatre burned down, and as long as classic movie channels and on demand services exist people will be able to watch Orson Welles as Citizen Kane.
But the specific technological requirements attached to video games – and particularly newer titles – work to erase this possibility in the realm of interactive entertainment. They’re born with an expiry date.
I’d go so far as to suggest that, over time, many games released today will end up sharing more in common with stage productions than books or movies or music. They will be appreciated in the moment, then eventually disappear. People will write about and record their experiences, and those words and videos will continue on to posterity, acting as the primary means by which they are remembered by gamers of the future.
http://bit.ly/186Z3Jw

Why video games will never have their “Citizen Kane moment”

By Chad Sapieha 

There is always a hope in an author or director or musician’s mind that what they’re creating might stand the test of time, that it may continue to draw audiences for decades – perhaps even centuries – into the future, long after their deaths.

Abbey Road isn’t doomed to obscurity because vinyl records have been largely replaced by digital recordings, Hamlet didn’t disappear when The Globe theatre burned down, and as long as classic movie channels and on demand services exist people will be able to watch Orson Welles as Citizen Kane.

But the specific technological requirements attached to video games – and particularly newer titles – work to erase this possibility in the realm of interactive entertainment. They’re born with an expiry date.

I’d go so far as to suggest that, over time, many games released today will end up sharing more in common with stage productions than books or movies or music. They will be appreciated in the moment, then eventually disappear. People will write about and record their experiences, and those words and videos will continue on to posterity, acting as the primary means by which they are remembered by gamers of the future.

http://bit.ly/186Z3Jw


  1. goodpistachios reblogged this from nationalpost
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  3. willowglade reblogged this from amelior8or
  4. amelior8or reblogged this from nationalpost and added:
    This is an interesting read, though I’m a little torn over how much I agree with it. Yes, the progression of media does...
  5. redamaranth reblogged this from hyperbali
  6. alyxdesigns reblogged this from upsettingshorts and added:
    Unless you make a game whose artistic style stands the test of time, similar to Metropolis, Battleship Potemkin, etc....
  7. kerrywall reblogged this from postarcadenp and added:
    Good read.
  8. turtleenterprises reblogged this from nationalpost
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    The Last of Us - NaughtyDog (2013)
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  16. bad-asstylerthecat reblogged this from nationalpost and added:
    The Last of Us!!!!!!!
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  21. pointlessmeganface reblogged this from nationalpost and added:
    I highly disagree with this because there are multiple ways to play classic games now since games are digital and can be...
  22. hyperbali reblogged this from upsettingshorts